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Medicare Common Access Card

Fraud prevention has become a hot button topic in recent years with the increase of items such as Apple Pay, Venmo and online banking. However, other industries find this subject relevant, including healthcare, in this case, Medicare.

The government currently loses $60 billion each year due to misuse of Medicare funds, including fraud. With so much money at stake and the proper technology now available, the Medicare Common Access Card Act of 2015 was proposed last July.

The bill is to be reviewed and then sent to the House or Senate. The goal is to establish a card pilot program. The current Medicare cards display private information such as social security numbers.  According to Re: ID Magazine, the new ones would not display this information. The new Medicare cards will be machine readable and fraud resistant; there will be a circuit chip with a secure microcontroller according to gov.track.us.  Those who qualify for the pilot program will be people whose identity has been breached in the past. The sponsor for this bill is Peter Roskam, Representative for Illinois’s 6th congressional district.  The pilot program will be under the title “XVIII (Medicare) of the Social Security Act.” The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid must report their findings within 2 years.

While it appears as though the U.S. government is taking a step in the right direction in terms of fraud prevention and identity maintenance, it will be quite a while if and when such a card is created. For more information on the ID industry, click here.

Digital Identity Verification

Digital IDentity (1)

 

With the birth of Apple Pay, C-Sam and other digital payment processes, it is no surprise that when it comes to identity validation, digital verification will become the norm. re: ID Magazine explains the implementation of this process and how exactly this technology works.

When we think of identity verification, we might think of a bouncer at a nightclub examining a driver’s, license, possibly scanning it, as well as matching it to the person who hands it to them. Digital verification makes this possible in the digital world but with a much higher level of vetting.

When you try and get access to your banking information, you most likely go through a vetting process called “knowledge-based authentication,” also known as “KBA.” KBA consists of a series of security questions that you must answer in order to gain access. After the 2015 hack into IRS records, it became apparent that KBA was not a secure enough way to verify identity. Now companies are relying on a few different measures to carry out this process. Doc Vaidhyanathan, vice president of management for CA Advanced Authentication states in re ID, “Nobody should rely on a system that says ‘if you know these three or four things, then it’s you.’KBA should just be one layer in verifying an identity.”

One company is doing just that. Verify, a British governmental company, allows citizens to create online identities utlizing a KBA test and linking their documents to this test. A person can take a picture of their document as well as a selfie and send it to Verify. Verify will then use facial recognition technology and a scanner to validate the document and the person’s identity. One of the companies that is pioneering this process in the U.S. is MorphoTrust.  They will be offering Identix which is a product that can be added to existing applications.

It will be interesting to see what other measures companies and governments take to make the identification process easier and more secure. For more information on ID news and updates click here.